Sunday, January 15, 2023

CLEFT PALATE PROCEDURES: Nobel Peace Prize Congressional Nomination for Humanitarianism in Action

HONORING DR. PAUL DRESCHNACK - Drafted by: Honorable Michael Bilirakis of FLA in the House of Representatives

Transcribed from the U.S. Congressional Record of the House of Representatives (4/1/1998). re-published by IPHA NEWS Editorial team.


Mr. Bilirakis, Mr. Speaker. I rise today to commend the work of one of my constituents, Dr. Paul Dreschnack-- a plastic surgeon who spends several weeks each year in India, voluntarily performing free operations on children born with facial defects. I recently nominated Dr. Dreschnack and his mentor, Dr. Sharad Kumar Dicksheet, for a Nobel Peace Prize. I would like to share with our colleagues the letter I submitted with their nomination application.  

On behalf of the United States House of Representatives, I thank Dr. Dreschnack and Dr. Dicksheet for their tireless work.  They are very worthy of this prestigious award and would uphold its tradition of outstanding recipients if it is awarded to them.

Dear Nobel Committee Members: It is my distinct privilege to bring before the Committee two physicians whose humanitarian contributions in the area of medicine have prompted me to submit their names for consideration as Nobel Prize Laureates.

I became acquainted with the work of Dr. Dicksheet and Dr. Dreschnack during a recent meeting with representatives from a local chapter of an international civic organization, the Rotary Club of Dunedin, North.  The story that unfolded over the next several hours could be submitted by the headlines of some of the articles contained in their packet: "The Doctor's Heart: A New York Doctor Returns to India to Give His Life's Earnings Back": "New Life to the Deformed"; "One Man, 20,000 Lives."

Most of us, as we mature and recognize that we have been the recipient of unearned blessings or talents in life, desire to give back to he community.  Such is the motive driving both Dr. Discksheet and Dr. Dreschnack. But their vision, the longevity and the largesse of their contributions sets them apart among men.

For thirty years, Dr. Sharad Dicksheet has spent approximately six months each year in the poorest regions of India, providing free surgery to those in need. He brings with him a small team of surgeons, often paying for their travel out of his own funds.


They arrive at one of the many Plastic Surgery Camps, or Shibers, as they are called. Year after year, the routine has been the same.  By daybreak, hundreds of people have arrived (some traveling hundreds of miles) to be evaluated for treatment.  In the recent years the number of arriving at each site has often increased to over one-thousand people.

Time and resources dictate that only those deemed treatable can be assured of surgery. The3 patients are primarily cleft lip and or cleft palate cases but include a variety of facial deformities of joints, and deformed ears and eyes.

By nine o'clock, separate operating tables have been set up for the team and the surgeries begin, continuing uninterrupted until six o'clock in the evening.  AN average of thirty-five surgeries are performed daily, but many times the number reaches more than fifty.  The statistics are phenomenal.  Since Dr. Dicksheet began his work in 1968, more than 40,000 operations have been performed. Financially, his contributions exceed $80 Million.

But what does the work mean to his patients? Nothing short of a new life! Infants who would have died, unable to suck milk, now thrive. Families outcast by the social stigma of deformity, are restored. Young girls (and boys), unmarriageable and unable to work or make a living, have a future.  Each of the 40,000 cases has a life changing story.  It would be impossible to accurately estimate the thousands of people whose lives have been positively affected by Dr. Dicksheet and his associates.  And when you consider that the doctors also each surgical techniques to Indian surgeons through the Indian Medical Society, the number increases even more.

What makes Dr. Dicksheet's story even more remarkable is that the doctor has conducted the majority of his humanitarian work while he, himself, has been in grave health.  About 18 years ago he underwent surgery for laryngeal cancer. His speech is, for the most part, inaudible and he must communicate in writing much of the time.  Ten years ago, he suffered a severe heart attack, followed by another attack in 1994.  In spite of his health he has continued to raise funds, travel and operate from a wheelchair.  At this time, however, his health has further deteriorated.  He is not expected to live much longer.  Over the years he has treated each day as a "bonanza" and has filled it with giving his life to his fellow man.  "I feel good in giving this service to my countrymen," he responds when asked about his work.

What will happen to his work? Preparation has been made to turn the work over to the very capable hands of Dr. Paul Dreschnack, who has worked with Dr. Dicksheet for nine years and shares his vision, enthusiasm and dedication. As Dr. Dreschnack responds in an interview in 1995, "I'll be doing it (the work) for a long time,"  I am very proud to count Dr. Paul Dreschnack as a resident of my Congressional District.

The humanitarian contributions of these men sets an example for the world.  They exemplify how much more we can give when we are willing to give our lives, totally.  They show us how much longer our vision can be when we refuse to see obstacles and we view our fellow man as a brother.

I am very pleased to bring Dr. Sharad Kumar Dicksheet and Dr. Paul Dreschnack before you.

With best wishes, I am Sincerely yours-

MICHAEL BILIRAKIS, Member of Congress


THE POWER OF COLLABORATION
By. Robert L. Bard, MD

Known by many of his peers as "Dr. Sir. Paul " (knighted by various European nations for his philanthropic work), I am honored to forge a collaborative partnership with his NYC practice and the advancement of his therapeutic research projects.  

Dr. Dreschnack stands today as one of the top rated experts in reconstructive and cosmetic procedures, while representing the best direction for the future of our medical society. He is one of the finest advocates for global health and a leader in some of the latest procedural innovations. Where a 4x nomination for the Nobel Peace Prize might affect one’s ego, Dr. Dreschnack remains the same kind and humble soul - always engaging others with that unending passion for collaborative ventures. When he first toured my diagnostic imaging facility in NYC, we immediately bonded because of his passion and uncompromising creativity for advancing therapeutic protocols.  Our relationship was cemented around the joys of technical brainstorming and the common goal of making a difference in patient care.

Reflecting on his work in India, Dr. Dreschnack broke new ground in clinical intervention protocols. His surgical talents combined with his courage to overcome geopolitical restrictions made his international crusade possible, improving and saving over 30,000 children's lives.  For this, he is clearly recognized in the world stage and well deserving of it.



Robert L. Bard, MD, DABR, FAIUM, FASLMS
Having paved the way for the study of various cancers both clinically and academically, Dr. Robert Bard is internationally recognized as a leader in the field of 21st Century 3-D ULTRASONOGRAPHIC VOLUMETRIC DOPPLER IMAGING. He co-founded the 9/11 CancerScan program to bring additional diagnostic support to all first responders from Ground Zero. His main practice in midtown, NYC (Bard Diagnostic Imaging- www.CancerScan.com) uses the latest in digital Imaging technology has been also used to help guide biopsies and in many cases, even replicate much of the same reports of a clinical invasive biopsy.


What is DR. PAUL DRESCHNACK Up To Today?

Dr. Paul Dreschnack is an internationally established reconstructive surgeon, a medical researcher and a humanitarian. He has been the recipient of numerous knighthoods, countless awards from the medical community and is a four time Nobel Peace Prize nominee [see Tampa Bay Times news/9/12/2005]. His expanded research in innovative therapeutic modalities continue to bring recognized success to his many patients and the world of medicine.

As a multimodality specialist, the success of Dr. Dreschnack's mission comes from combining the latest clinical findings from his advanced biological research work with his leadership in surgical care. From 1978-1999, Dr. Dreschnack achieved world notoriety with a team of surgeons by operating on an est. 250,000 to 300,000 children (free of charge) with birth defects in India.  This surgery impacted so many lives from social exclusion, unemployment and limited marriage possibilities, that often lead to the death of these children. 

Today, Dr. Dreschnack continues to perform his specialized work in both reconstructive surgery and therapeutic care. He runs various private practices throughout the New York/New Jersey area and is also the chief surgical specialist at PAUL A. DRESCHNACK, MD. P.C. in the New York metropolitan area.  Moreover, Dr. Dreschnack was recently appointed a top educational advocacy role with IPHA (Integrative Pain Healers Alliance) and is poised to form new research protocols on restorative care and advanced recovery solutions.


MEDICAL ROLE MODEL* is a feature series published by IPHA NEWS. Each report showcases a peer nominated individual  purely for his/her leadership, interpersonal or professional achievements and whose work is recognized for their notable merit to the community. MEDICAL ROLE MODEL* is an educational report about chosen individuals who are also members of the INTEGRATIVE PAIN HEALERS ALLIANCE.  All reports are for public information only and is not to be misconstrued as commercial marketing for that individual in any way whatsoever.

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Friday, January 13, 2023

WHERE RECONSTRUCTIVE SCIENCE MEETS CLINICAL AESTHETICS

MEDICAL ROLE MODELS: 
Nobel Peace Prize  Congressional Nomination for Humanitarianism in Action

Transcribed from the U.S. Congressional Record of the House of Representatives (4/1/1998)

HONORING DR. PAUL DRESCHNACK - Drafted by: Honorable Michael Bilrakis of FLA in the House of Representatives

Mr. Bilrakis, Mr. Speaker. I rise today to commend the work of one of my constituents, Dr. Paul Dreschnack. Dr. Dreschnack is a plastic surgeon who spends several weeks each year in India, voluntarily performing free operations on children born with facial defects. I recently nominated Dr. Dreschnack and his mentor, Dr. Sharad Kumar Dicksheet, for a Nobel Peace Prize. I would like to share with our colleagues the letter I submitted with their nomination application.  

On behalf of the United States House of Representatives, I thank Dr. Dreschnack and Dr. Dicksheet for their tireless work.  They are very worthy of this prestigious award and would uphold its tradition of outstanding recipients if it is awarded to them.

Dear Nobel Committee Members: It is my distinct privilege to bring before the Committee two physicians whose humanitarian contributions in the area of medicine have prompted me to submit their names for consideration as Nobel Prize Laureates.

I became acquainted with the work of Dr. Dicksheet and Dr. Dreschnack during a recent meeting with representatives from a local chapter of an international civic organization, the Rotary Club of Dunedin, North.  The story that unfolded over the next several hours could be submitted by the headlines of some of the articles contained in their packet: "The Doctor's Heart: A New York Doctor Returns to India to Give His Life's Earnings Back": "New Life to the Deformed"; "One Man, 20,000 Lives."

Most of us, as we mature and recognize that we have been the recipient of unearned blessings or talents in life, desire to give back to he community.  Such is the motive driving both Dr. Discksheet and Dr. Dreschnack. But their vision, the longevity and the largesse of their contributions sets them apart among men.

For thirty years, Dr. Sharad Dicksheet has spent approximately six months each year in the poorest regions of India, providing free surgery to those in need. He brings with him a small team of surgeons, often paying for their travel out of his own funds.


They arrive at one of the many Plastic Surgery Camps, or Shibers, as they are called. Year after year, the routine has been the same.  By daybreak, hundreds of people have arrived (some traveling hundreds of miles) to be evaluated for treatment.  In the recent years the number of arriving at each site has often increased to over one-thousand people.

Time and resources dictate that only those deemed treatable can be assured of surgery. The3 patients are primarily cleft lip and or cleft palate cases but include a variety of facial deformities of joints, and deformed ears and eyes.

By nine o'clock, separate operating tables have been set up for the team and the surgeries begin, continuing uninterrupted until six o'clock in the evening.  AN average of thirty-five surgeries are performed daily, but many times the number oreaches more than fifty.  The statistics are phenomenal.  Since Dr. Dicksheet began his work in 1968, more than 40,000 operations have been performed. Financially, his contributions exceed $80 Million.

But what does the work mean to his patients? Nothing short of a new life! Infants who would have died, unable to suck milk, now thrive. Families outcast by the social stigma of deformity, are restored. Young girls (and boys), unmarriageable and unable to work or make a living, have a future.  Each of the 40,000 cases has a life changing story.  It would be impossible to accurately estimate the thousands of people whose lives have been positively affected by Dr. Dicksheet and his associates.  And when you consider that the doctors also each surgical techniques to Indian surgeons through the Indian Medical Society, the number increases even more.

What makes Dr. Dicksheet's story even more remarkable is that the doctor has conducted the majority of his humanitarian work while he, himself, has been in grave health.  About 18 years ago he underwent surgery for laryngeal cancer. His speech is, for the most part, inaudible and he must communicate in writing much of the time.  Ten years ago, he suffered a severe heart attack, followed by another attack in 1994.  In spite of his health he has continued to raise funds, travel and operate from a wheelchair.  At this time, however, his health has further deteriorated.  He is not expected to live much longer.  Over the years he has treated each day as a "bonanza" and has filled it with giving his life to his fellow man.  "I feel good in giving this service to my countrymen," he responds when asked about his work.

What will happen to his work? Preparation has been made to turn the work over to the very capable hands of Dr. Paul Dreschnack, who has worked with Dr. Dicksheet for nine years and shares his vision, enthusiasm and dedication. As Dr. Dreschnack responds in an interview in 1995, "I'll be doing it (the work) for a long time,"  I am very proud to count Dr. Paul Dreschnack as a resident of my Congressional District.

The humanitarian contributions of these men sets an example for the world.  They exemplify how much more we can give when we are willing to give our lives, totally.  They show us how much longer our vision can be when we refuse to see obstacles and we view our fellow man as a brother.

I am very pleased ot bring Dr. Sharad Kumar Dicksheet and Dr. Paul Dreschnack before you.


With best wishes, I am Sincerely yours,

MICHAEL BILRAKIS, member of Congress.



Who is DR. PAUL DRESCHNACK?

Dr. Paul Dreschnack is an internationally established reconstructive surgeon, a medical researcher and a humanitarian. He has been the recipient of numerous knighthoods, countless awards from the medical community and is a four time Nobel Peace Prize nominee [see Tampa Bay Times news/9/12/2005]. His expanded research in innovative therapeutic modalities continue to bring recognized success to his many patients and the world of medicine.

As a multimodality specialist, the success of Dr. Dreschnack's mission comes from combining the latest clinical findings from his advanced biological research work with his leadership in surgical care. From 1978-1999, Dr. Dreschnack achieved world notoriety with a team of surgeons by operating on an est. 250,000 to 300,000 children (free of charge) with birth defects in India.  This surgery impacted so many lives from social exclusion, unemployment and limited marriage possibilities, that often lead to the death of these children. 

Today, Dr. Dreschnack continues to perform his specialized work in both reconstructive surgery and therapeutic care. He runs various private practices throughout the New York/New Jersey area and is also the chief surgical specialist at PAUL A. DRESCHNACK, MD. P.C. in the New York metropolitan area.  Moreover, Dr. Dreschnack was recently appointed a top educational advocacy role with IPHA (Integrative Pain Healers Alliance) and is poised to form new research protocols on restorative care and advanced recovery solutions.


CLEFT PALATE PROCEDURES: Nobel Peace Prize Congressional Nomination for Humanitarianism in Action

HONORING DR. PAUL DRESCHNACK - Drafted by: Honorable Michael Bilirakis of FLA in the House of Representatives Transcribed from the U.S. Cong...